I was just down in Phoenix for a funeral and decided to record some of my good friend Robert Fernandez (yes the author of the book below :), percussion for 2 purposes.

1. I am going to make a sample library with them and,

2. I wanted some patterns I could use not only to demonstrate the samples, but to have “human” feel midi grooves.

It was a long session, but we got a lot done. I focused on percussion that was unique and probably not really available anywhere else. 

I have many notes, and will probably release these as single instruments in Kontakt, SFZ, EasySampler, and, if I can figure it out, VST3. LOL.

What I have so far. All multiple samples and velocities. The patterns will be an addon, but who knows what the “founders” special will be ;)

Please excuse the images (these will be updated when my graphics guy fixes them), and the examples (no real mixing, so you are hearing them pretty much as recorded).

Bata: Recorded with one mic on each side. Iya, Itotele, and Okonkolo, plus boca (high side). Pattern is Oggún.

Okonkolo Bata image

Okonkolo (© Jon Griffin)

Quijada: This was recorded with a close mic and an overhead. Patterns include a Cuban style and a Peruvian style.

Cuban Style of Quijada Playing

(Pans) Saltanes: These are from Brazil and I recorded the low and high “saltanes” with both close and overhead mics. Pattern is included.

African Bell: Robert picked up this bell during his studies in Ghana. It includes close and overhead, muted and open notes.

Abacus: Yeah, well nobody probably has this. It made him a ton of money back in the studio days in LA. Yes, it’s an abacus, and includes forward and backward hits. Plus a groove.

Dominican Clave: How many of you knew this even existed? There are multiple samples and a typical pattern.

Oriente de Cuba, this is used in Oriente (Gaga), Haiti (rara), Mexico. I have a short, long, and longer “call”. Why a call? In Haiti this is used in the Call of the Slave traditionally.